My Gear

Like any photographer, your gear is important and a highly personal experience. Unlike other photographers, underwater photographers need to have both a solid photography kit as well as great scuba equipment so I’ll talk about both here.

Photography Equipment

The equipment you use is a natural progression. My first underwater camera I ever used was my dad’s Canon G-12 in a Canon housing. No strobes, just an underwater point and shoot basically, using strictly ambient or natural light. Honestly, the G-12 captured some really great images. So good, that I won a number of photo awards in high school. One in particular, the Omar Cooper Award lead me to the South Florida Underwater Photo Society and a member Chris Guglielmo my first mentor who helped me learn the basics for DSLR underwater photography. 

Diving Equipment

Probably more important than having great photography equipment, you diving equipment provides comfort, convenience and most of all safety. Like my photography equipment, my diving equipment has been an evolution and is dictated by both budget and diving circumstances that is unique to everyone. 

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1 month ago

Oceanprophotography

Pelagic nudibranch in free fall

Photographed during a blackwater dive off the coast of West Palm Beach, FL
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2 months ago

Oceanprophotography

Lone Silky in the sun

Photographed off of Jupiter, Florida
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2 months ago

Oceanprophotography

Rarely seen Juvenile Long Arm Octopus photographed during a blackwater dive off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida in 600 ft of water at a depth of 70 ft with Pura Vida Divers
Photo by Andre Johnson
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3 months ago

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4 months ago

Oceanprophotography

Pederson’s Anemone Shrimps have a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with its sea anemone in which it hosts.

These shrimps are dependent on the sea anemone and are rarely found far from them because although they have a shell, the anemone provides protection from predators. In return, the shrimp cleans the anemone removing organism caught in the anemone’s mucus. Therefore, they feed on the tiny organisms and detritus that get caught in the anemones mucus.

The cleaner shrimp also wave their antennae to attract fish to their “cleaning stations”. The cleaner shrimp has a mutulistic relationship with the fish. They remove parasites from stationary fish that are passing by. Not only cleaning externally they also clean inside the mouths and gills of fish and other marine life wishing to be cleaned.

Although the Pederson’s cleaner shrimp have an armored exoskeleton, this does not protect them from the sea anemones sting produced by the nematocysts. The cleaning shrimp has to adapt themselves to their host. This is done by slowly making contact with the tentacles of the anemone. After this process is done repeatedly, the shrimp develops immunity and can move about the anemone unaffected. Similarly, the anemone also no longer notices the presence of the shrimp.
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