Testimonials

Andre’s work is so creative and outside the norm of what most creatives shoot. Its a great perspective and a outstanding addition to our offices. I also appreciate the improved packaging for shipping. The canvas prints in the floating frames are very well done. Bravo.

Brian Perry

SRQ Photo

I love love love my underwater portrait. Andre did a great job and the session was really fun. I had lots of choices in the end and he gave me lots of options for prints and my portfolio. I’ll do it again soon.

Nikki Corbett

USF

Facebook Posts

6 days ago

Oceanprophotography
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2 weeks ago

Oceanprophotography

Pederson’s Anemone Shrimps have a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with its sea anemone in which it hosts.

These shrimps are dependent on the sea anemone and are rarely found far from them because although they have a shell, the anemone provides protection from predators. In return, the shrimp cleans the anemone removing organism caught in the anemone’s mucus. Therefore, they feed on the tiny organisms and detritus that get caught in the anemones mucus.

The cleaner shrimp also wave their antennae to attract fish to their “cleaning stations”. The cleaner shrimp has a mutulistic relationship with the fish. They remove parasites from stationary fish that are passing by. Not only cleaning externally they also clean inside the mouths and gills of fish and other marine life wishing to be cleaned.

Although the Pederson’s cleaner shrimp have an armored exoskeleton, this does not protect them from the sea anemones sting produced by the nematocysts. The cleaning shrimp has to adapt themselves to their host. This is done by slowly making contact with the tentacles of the anemone. After this process is done repeatedly, the shrimp develops immunity and can move about the anemone unaffected. Similarly, the anemone also no longer notices the presence of the shrimp.
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4 weeks ago

Oceanprophotography

Octopus in a field of green🌱

Photographed during a dive at the Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, Florida.
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1 month ago

Oceanprophotography

When in doubt, pinky out!

Atlantic Longarm Octopus 🐙

Photographed at the Blue Heron Bridge in Riviera Beach, Florida.
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1 month ago

Oceanprophotography

L E M O N 🍋 L O V E ❤️

The scaring on one of the lemons is likely from recent mating where the male shark will often bite onto the female to hold themselves during mating.

All sharks tend to practice biting as a way to get the attention of the female. Female sharks tend to have bite marks across their bodies after mating, though these bites are not as ferocious as feeding bites.
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